Author Topic: Dallas Comic Con vs Comicpalooza  (Read 14170 times)

Darius

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Dallas Comic Con vs Comicpalooza
« on: May 20, 2013, 11:43:51 AM »
We just returned from Dallas Comic Con.  The con was a bit odd, and not just because we weren't vendors.  We assumed it was going to be a lot like other cons, but it really wasn't.  On a slightly tangential note about attendance figures, for profit companies use dirty accounting to increase attendance.  For example, if the con runs 3 days, and you buy a 3 day pass, the single person gets counted 3 times.  Almost all not-for-profit cons count actual people attending.  So I will be listing both their numbers and probably something closer to the actual number of attendees. 

Dallas Comic Con (DCC)

Attendance: 20,000/8,000
Dealers Room:  Mostly people selling autographs, old toys, comics, and original art work.  Approximately 36 vendors based on their list, but it seemed like more although it didn't seem like a lot.
Artist Alley:  Only comic artists, probably around a dozen or so in a small room. 
Events:  Two rooms.  One room had A-list celebs giving 45 min Q&A, and the other room was for comic writers.  Costume contest
Costuming:  Some, but not as much as you would expect from a convention.  However, the costumes weren't inappropriate and they were all well done. 
Steampunk:  Virtually non-existent (at least when we were there).  There was supposed to be one dealer selling items, but didn't see it.  Less than one dozen dressed up, only 2 of which looked like they spent a lot of time/money on their outfit. 


Comicpalooza, Houston TX

Attendance: 10,600/4000
Dealers Room:  Anime, comics, rpgs, books, toys, costuming, jewellery.  Approximately 100 vendors, although some vendors are just there to promote something not sell items. 
Artist Alley:  Contains anything that is predominately made by the seller.  This includes comics, comic art, authors, book publishers, rpg publishers, custom leather, armor, jewelry, soap, hats, stuffed animals, corsets.  Approximately 140 vendors set up, however many of these are "guest" comic author spots. 
Layout:  Dealer's room and artist alley are set up in a shared area along with guest autographs.  The total area is close to 4 times the size of the square footage for DCC dealer's/artist area not to mention tables are more cramped together.
Events:  Set up like a traditional con.  Celebrity Q&A panels, but often more limited seating.  How-to panels (get into comics, be published, make cat ears), discussion of fandom, anime room, children's entertainment/child watching, independent films, costume contest, body paint contest, special effects contest, table-top gaming, video gaming, roller derby, LARP demos, concerts, wrestling.
Costuming:  Significantly more costuming than DCC, but a higher degree of inappropriate costumes as well as less quality in the majority of the costumes. 
Steampunk: pretty big last year, should be even bigger this year due to a push to make it steampunk.  There is a steampunk ball with 3 bands and a steampunk alley.  Numerous people will be selling items.  There will be 3 steampunkish rpgs being sold/played.  Probably 200+ people dressed up in top of the line steampunk outfits. 

Summery:  DCC is a media event grafted onto a small comic convention.  You pay to have access to some top actors with your admissions.  This is what draws the bulk of fans in.  The remaining fans are mostly into comic books.  Comicpalooza is a more traditional con that is trying to become a huge media convention, a la San Diego Comic Con.  The number of people attending is smaller, but the convention, in terms of physical space is 3 times the size of DCC and obviously has way more events.  More industry guests, but not as many A-list/recent stars, e.g. DCC can get William Shatner, Richard Dean Anderson, and Nathan Fillion, Comicpalooza gets George Takei, Keven Sorbo, and Claudia Christian.  Comicpalooza has more guests and is getting more well-know/recent actors each year. 

Semi-Retired Gamer

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Re: Dallas Comic Con vs Comicpalooza
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2013, 12:45:53 PM »
Interesting differences!  I wonder why they feel the need to exaggerate the numbers on attendance?  I wouldn't think the larger numbers would influence that many additional people to go.  It sounds like a mish-mash of these two cons would be awesome.
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Charlie

I (mainly) blog about role-playing at The Semi-Retired Gamer and occasionally at A Megaversal® Miscellany.

Reading:  The Lair of Bones by David Farland.

Darius

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Re: Dallas Comic Con vs Comicpalooza
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2013, 01:14:59 PM »
I have no idea why they exaggerate attendance figures.  I suppose part of it is to make it seem more impressive.  I only found out about this last fall.  I was looking into DragonCon and was reading about their attendance.  That led to information about how they changed how they tallied their attendance figures and then the fact that for-profit cons use a different tally system than your fan run cons.  I suppose DragonCon is a combination of these.  It started as a traditional con, then grew huge, which in turn attracted larger stars.

SpaceCity Con in Houston I think is trying to be a huge con like DragonCon.  It needs a few more years and a larger budget to get there.  Still, for only a 2nd year con they have attracted some big enough names. http://spacecitycon.com/

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Re: Dallas Comic Con vs Comicpalooza
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2013, 05:34:20 PM »
That link provided some cool information about the con.  I looked over the gaming information and was pleased with the selection.  It looks like a fun selection to choose from.  New Gods of Mankind sounds intriguing.
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Charlie

I (mainly) blog about role-playing at The Semi-Retired Gamer and occasionally at A Megaversal® Miscellany.

Reading:  The Lair of Bones by David Farland.