Author Topic: Stacking Armor  (Read 856 times)

johnse

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Stacking Armor
« on: September 04, 2016, 04:03:30 PM »
The rules address stacking shields with other armor, but there also seem to be some other combinations that would work. For example, one of my players wants their character to have a reinforced corset and a lined trenchcoat. This seems perfectly reasonable in terms of bulk, and per the rules would seem to give an AF 11 with a speed penalty of 4. The lined trenchcoat could seemingly be a useful add-on to many of the armor types.

Also, if the AF is greater than the max damage of an attack, is the wearer truly impervious? Ex. spiderbrains do 1d4 of 1d10 damage if they hit, but AF is applied to each of the 1d10's instead of the total. The above combination, or a cuirass would seem to therefore be impervious.

The armor rules also mention an optional damage type rule where armor can be damaged, but I haven't seen anything else about how to handle that. Can you elaborate?

Darius

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Re: Stacking Armor
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2016, 08:13:38 PM »
Shields stack with other armor for two reasons.

1. It is meant to represent the abstract benefit of a shield plus other armor.  In reality, it should only work if the shield takes part of the blow, but that makes combat more complicated. 
2. Shields are further outside of the body and allow for partial deflection of hits that then enable less damage to be taken. 

The stacking of other armor won't really work.  Everything would be on the body so all of the energy is already there.  The rules are not intended to allow the stacking of armor.  Instead, it is the highest AF that works.  A coat and a corset aren't going to protect your head, it is meant to be an abstract method.  For more realism, you could determine AF by body part and use the advanced combat rules.

As for armor durability:

The durability of armor is determined by multiplying its AF by 10. Every hit reduces the durability by 1 point. Every 10 points of durability loss results in 1 point less of armor protection. In cases
where the durability is above 100, there is a minimal amount of protection the armor will provide regardless of its actual durability. For every 10 points above 100, there is a minimum of 1 point of protection, e.g. 110 provides at minimum 1 point, 120 provides 2 points, etc.

AF greater than damage.

Yes, fit he AF is greater than damage, then the PC is generally immune.  It depends on the damage type and sometimes hits ignore all armor protection.  But, one thing to consider.  If you are in full metal armor, you are going to move slow, be loud, and be very noticeable.  That means probably always losing initiative and sucking at saving throws.  If the PC were to end up on his back or the ground, it will take a few rounds to get up, unless someone helps.  It is hot.  You will take double damage from heat or electricity attacks.  It interferes with casting spells. 

The idea of that armor is sometimes you will need a PC to be a tank.  They will be able to go into a situation and hack and slash and take minimal damage.  If you are going into battle or exploring an ancient ruin filled with undead.  But, it isn't going to be armor people will just walk around on the street with daily. 

The adventures were designed to slowly wear the PCs down before a harder battle at the end.  These combats are designed to create some tension, add to the story, consume some PC resources, and slightly weaken the PCs.  The writer did not think that the entire group would be in decked out max AF armor.  If your group does that, then you will need to adjust.  You can either add more creatures/different types or increase their damage to balance out the combat.  But, if it is just one PC, then you shouldn't need to tinker too much.  Creatures don't have to be stupid.  They can go after the weaker ones or find some other method to deal with a high AF target. 

Spiderbrains

These creatures do 1d10/ per leg and can hit with up to 4 legs.  So, a successful hit, could in theory, do 4d10 damage.

johnse

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Re: Stacking Armor
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2016, 04:00:20 PM »
OK. Thank you for the detailed explanation.

Re: Spiderbrains
Yes, they can do up to 4d10, but they apply AF to each of the 1d10 hits separately--thus the thought that a high AF character would be immune.

I will let my players know the reasoning behind the non-stacking of non-shields. That certainly makes for a better balance.